Welcome to Yakima Alliance Church Welcome to Yakima Alliance Church
HomeEventsLinks
bTalk
Navigation
1. REFLECTIONS
2. SERMONS
3. INFORMATION GUIDE
4. PUBLICATIONS
Recovery Group
Search the Bible
Search the Bible:


Examples: Psalm 27; John 15
love one another; Psalm 23

The Inadequacy of "Instant Christianity"

The Inadequacy of 'Instant Christianity�

 

It is hardly a matter of wonder that the country that gave the world instant tea and instant coffee should be the one to give it 'Instant Christianity'.  If these two beverages were not actually invented in the United States, it was certainly here that they received the advertising impetus that haw made them known to most of the civilized world.  And it cannot be denied that it was American Fundamentalism that brought 'Instant Christianity' to the gospel churches.

 

Ignoring for the moment Romanism and Liberalism in its various disguises, and focusing our attention upon the great body of evangelical believers, we see at once how deeply the religion of Christ has suffered in the house of its friends.  The American genius for getting things done quickly and easily with little concern for quality or permanence has bred a virus that has infected the whole evangelical church in the United States and, through our literature, our evangelists and our missionaries, has spread all over the world.

 

'Instant Christianity' came in with the machine age.  Men invented machines for two purposes.  They wanted to get important work done more quickly and easily than they could do it by hand, and they wanted to get the work over with so they could give their time to pursuits more to their liking,  such as loafing or enjoying the pleasures of the world.  'Instant Christianity' now serves the same purposes in religion.  It disposes of the past, guarantees the future and sets the Christian free to follow the more refined lusts of the flesh in all good conscience and with a minimum of restraint.

 

By �Instant Christian� I mean the kind found almost everywhere in gospel circles and which is born to our own souls by one act of faith, or at most by two, and be relieved thereafter of all anxiety about our spiritual condition that we may discharge our total obligation to our own and we are permitted to infer from this that there is no reason to seek to be saints by character.  An automatic, one-for-all quality is present here that is completely out of mode with the faith of the New Testament.

 

In this error, as in most others, there lies a certain amount of truth imperfectly understood.  It is thru that conversion to Christ may be and often is sudden.  Where the burden of sin has been heavy the she sense of forgiveness is equal to the degree of moral repugnance left in repentance.. The true Christian has met God.  He knows he has eternal life and he is likely to know where and when he received it.  And those also who have been filled with the Holy Spirit subsequent to their regeneration have a clear-cut experience of being filled.  The Spirit is self-announcing, and the renewed heart has no difficulty identifying His presence as He floods in over the soul.

 

But the trouble is that we tend to put our trust in our experiences and as a consequence misread the entire New Testament.  We are constantly being exhorted to make the decision, to settle the matter now, to get the whole thing taken care of at once � and those who exhort us are right in doing so.  There are decisions that can be and should be made once and for all.  There are personal matters that can be settled instantaneously by a determined act of the will in response to Bible-grounded faith.  No one would want to deny this; certainly not I.

 

 

The question before us is, just how much can be accomplished in that one act of faith?  How much yet remains to be done and how far can a single decision take us?

 

�Instant Christianity� tends to make the faith act terminal and so smothers the desire for spiritual advance.  It fails to understand the true nature of the Christian life, which is not static but dynamic and expanding.  It overlooks the fact that a new Christian is a living organism as certainly as a new baby is, and most have nourishment and exercise to assure normal growth.  It does not consider that the act of faith in Christ sets up a personal relationship between two intelligent moral beings, God and the reconciled man, and no single encounter between God and a creature made in His image could ever be sufficient to establish an intimate friendship between them.

 

By trying to pack all of salvation into one experience, or two, the advocates of �Instant Christianity� flaunt the law of development which runs through all nature.  They ignore the sanctifying effects of suffering, cross carrying and practical obedience.  They pass by the need for spiritual training, the necessity of forming right religious habits and the need to wrestle against the world, the devil and the flesh.

 

Undue preoccupation with the initial act of believing has created in some a psychology of contentment, or at least of non-expectation.  To many it has imparted a mood of disappointment with the Christian faith.  God seems too far away, the world is too near, and the flesh too powerful to resist.  Others are glad to accept the assurance of automatic blessedness.  It relieves them of the need to watch and fight and pray, and sees them free to enjoy this world while waiting for the next.

 

�Instant Christianity� is twentieth-century orthodoxy. I wonder whether the man who wrote Philippians 3:7-16 would recognize it as the faith for which he finally died.  I am afraid he would not.

 

Set as your default homepage Add favorite      Copyright 2003 - 2004 by VASTNetworks. All rights reserved.